Man With Autism Writes a Heartfelt Handwritten Letter in Quest of Finding a Job | "I Don't Learn Like Typical People Do"

Ryan Lowry penned a motivation letter that was flooded with job offers from various companies.

Man With Autism Writes a Heartfelt Handwritten Letter in Quest of Finding a Job | "I Don't Learn Like Typical People Do"
Image Source: Ryan Lowry | LinkedIn
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Ryan Lowry, an autistic person who wrote a pretty unique cover letter in the quest of finding a job resonated with many when he posted the same on LinkedIn. Lowry posted a handwritten letter on the platform that surely stood out from the rest. He wrote in the letter that his learning arc doesn't work in a traditional fashion but he adds that he is a quick learner. His letter resonated with many people on the platform who feel that people like him deserve a chance as all that matters is diligence, "I realize that someone like you will have to take a chance on me, I don't learn like typical people do," as per CNN

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He added I would need a mentor to teach me, but I learn quickly, once you explain it, I get it. I promise that if you hire me and teach me, you'll be glad that you did. I will show up every day, do what you tell me to do, and work really hard. The 20-year-old is a resident of Leesburg, Virginia. He posted the letter on the site and captioned his post, "Please see my letter to future employers." 



 

Ryan Lowry is almost a graduate and is working at SimplyBe, a coffee shop but that's set to end once he graduates. He writes in his letter that he wants to work in animation or IT. He had plans to type it out on the computer but his younger brother said, "'Why don't you write it?" Lowry has now numerous companies reaching out to him. However, he is inclined toward an offer from  Exceptional Minds for a three-year program designed to teach autistic people with autism about animation. Lowry is pumped about his next job and is building an amazing portfolio in the process. His mother Tracy Lowry said, "I'm in awe and never thought this would happen over one written letter," said Tracy Lowry. "I'm overwhelmed with joy for Ryan and for it opening a whole topic of conversation among employers to helping ... people other than Ryan."



 

 

His post was flooded with positive comments one user wrote, "I'm in awe and never thought this would happen over one written letter," said Tracy Lowry. "I'm overwhelmed with joy for Ryan and for it opening a whole topic of conversation among employers to helping ... people other than Ryan. Another LinkedIn user, Tyler Cameron, called on employers to do more to become inclusive. "The unemployment rate for people with autism is upwards of 85 percent. The reason is simple — they have the skills to do the jobs, but employers screen them out, either with "personality tests", which have a heavy preference for neurotypicals, or with BS interview practices (surprise panel interview, ridiculous questions like "how many jelly beans can you fit inside of a 747"). As a sperg, I get an overwhelming sense of "we don't want you here" at almost any interview I go to," commented Cameron.