Eyeball jewelry: Get some eye-bling by having platinum-jewelry inserted in your eyeball

Eyeball jewelry: Get some eye-bling by having platinum-jewelry inserted in your eyeball

And you thought "twinkle of the eye" was just a compliment? Here's a doctor taking the centuries-old adage to a whole new level!

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT.

Proving that nothing is impossible, one doctor has taken his expertise and turned it on its head by performing a jittery eye-surgery that involves insertion of jewelry in the eyeball.


 

Platinum Eye Jewelry-I’m the only US surgeon implanting these, and only 3 people in the US have them now (the last one was a Russian girl who likes “bling”) but hundreds have been done in Europe without a single complication. The procedure is very safe, without any risk of visual loss. The only complication that has been seen is minor bruising at the site which resolves after a few days, and can be considered part of the normal insertion process. The implant is medical grade platinum, sterile, and totally inert in the body without any chance of allergic reaction. It’s also polished without any sharp edges & curved to conform to the shape of the eye, to prevent any chance of migration or extrusion or intrusion. A 3mm incision is made into the conjunctiva, which is the clear covering your eye, and the implant gently slipped in. The incision is so small no suture is needed, and it heals itself after only 1-2 days. The procedure takes 5 min, requires only topical anesthesia (eye drops) & is totally painless. It can be removed at any time in 3 min. We charge $10,000 which includes explanation at any time. Swapping out the implant for another implant is $5000. A custom implant adds $5000. I graduated from Dartmouth, Columbia, Harvard, Emory & NYU, am in MENSA, have published 100 articles, have presented at ARVO, AAO, ASCRS & ESCRS, have lectured in a dozen countries, was PI for the FDA study of the first solid state excimer laser & have performed over 20,000 PRK, LASIK, LASEK & EpiLASEK procedures over a 22-year career with a perfect record (100% of patients legal to drive; $0 in legal settlements). So I certainly wouldn’t perform any procedure that wasn’t perfectly safe!👏#eye #jewelry #silver #platinum #gold #bling #eye #eyes #eyejewelry #unique #prk #lasek #lasik #mensa #ophthalmology #optometry #optician #innovative #new #perfect

A post shared by Dr. Emil Chynn (& Tolstoy🙃) (@emilchynn) on


To put it clearly, it involves implanting platinum jewelry called "SafeSight" jewelry into the patient's eyeball. Mind you, it is a piece of metal implanted IN THE EYEBALL. 

Enough said.

via GIPHY

"Sparkle in the eye"

New York City ophthalmologist Dr. Emil Chynn once again grabbed global headlines recently when he published a video of himself performing the nail-biting procedure. The process required the insertion of a 3mm-by-4mm-wide platinum heart into the patient's eyeball at Manhattan's Park Avenue Laser Vision. 



Astoundingly, the five-minute procedure, as described by the doctor, is a pain-free operation and takes only three days to heal after the conjunctiva (the mucous membrane that covers the front of the eye and lines the inside of the eyelids) seals.



After three days the patient can't even feel the less-than 1mm thick jewel, as it is carefully smoothened, polished and looped to fit perfectly to the natural shape of the eye. 



Chynn is reportedly the first surgeon in New York to have ever performed the eyeball jewelry surgery, which is said to be a popular choice for "hundreds" in Europe. Reportedly, it was performed once in Los Angeles for an unnamed celebrity. 



If you're wondering why just platinum? SafeSight Jewelry comes only in platinum (in limited shapes—popular choice being heart and stars) as it has a lower chance of allergic reaction than gold. And if you are actually mulling over getting one or not? Remember that the procedure costs an eye-watering $3,000 and a change of implant costs a separate $1,000.

The video shows the procedure being performed on a patient named Skyler, who is one of the three people in the United States to have undergone the cosmetic enhancement.

The first step involves Chynn prepping Skyler by giving a topical anesthetic and sterilizing the surface of the eyeball. Then, the eyes are kept open with a speculum, followed by making a small incision between the sclera (the white part of your eye) and the conjunctiva (the clear membrane that covers the sclera). The platinum is then inserted.

Dr. Chynn with Skyler, post-surgery. (Youtube)
Dr. Chynn with Skyler, post-surgery. (Youtube)

With 20-years of experience to his credit, Chynn asserted that the chance of developing an allergic reaction or scarring from the jewel is minimal, as the body is able to accept the medical-grade of metal.

Here's how it goes. Watch:

"This is a purely cosmetic surgery. There are only two or three people in the whole of the United States of America that have undergone this. It is not widely sought and I'm performing less than one surgery per year, out of a population of over 325 million," Chynn was quoted as saying by The Mirror.

"Eye jewelry was developed in Holland over a decade ago and has been successfully implanted into hundreds of patients' eyes in Europe without a single major complication or adverse event," he added further.

On Chynn's website, the surgery has been deemed safe with "absolutely no risk of going blind or any visual loss."

The truth of the matter...

In order to truly understand the repercussions of the cosmetic surgery, it would be fair to seek opinions from the patients who have undergone the procedure.

In 2013, Lucy Luckayanko, then 25, was the first patient to have received a shiny platinum heart in the corner of her right eye. 



Safe to say that she was impressed and was in awe of herself for quite some time.

"It's going to be a conversation maker," Luckayanko was quoted as saying by The Daily News. "I will be able to tell people. It will be unique. It will be sort of my unique factor," she described further.

P.S: Luckayanko resumed work within two days.

But other medical experts aren't really fans.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology had stated that it "has not identified sufficient evidence to support the safety or therapeutic value of this procedure," urged people to "avoid placing in the eye any foreign body or material that is not proven to be medically safe or approved by the FDA."

This was 2013. There is no update available on the FDA approval, currently. 

Still mulling? Are you?

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