8 things you didn't know about the female body

8 things you didn't know about the female body

This article traces researches to highlight how not so popular facts affect our view of the female body

Many of us often wonder about the toughness and resistance our bodies can muster in potentially painful instances. Even so, many can’t understand how females go through tremendous amounts of pain on a regular basis, biologically.

SOurce: Pexels
SOurce: Pexels

There are certain characteristics of their physiology that has developed over time through evolution and with the impact of the societal milieu. Thus, some of the crucial facts about a female body are less obvious and noticeable.

And thus, we bring you those 8 things you ought to know about a female body.

1. Females and males have a different neural architecture

image source: Wikimedia Commons
image source: Wikimedia Commons

In a recent study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, it was found that females had denser neural circuits connecting the left and the right hemispheres of the brain – so they have higher memory and social skills, which make them fluid in multitasking.  

Whereas, the neural networks of men have stronger circuits connecting the front and back regions – giving men stronger perception and body coordination.

2. Women live longer than men

Image source: Pixabay
Image source: Pixabay

According to Kathryn Sandberg, director of the Center for the Study of Sex Differences in health, aging and disease at Georgetown University, says, ‘Cardiovascular disease occurs much earlier in men than women. The age of onset of hypertension [high blood pressure] also occurs much earlier in men than women.

And there’s a sex difference in the rate of progression of a disease.’ Biologically, at every age, women seem to survive better than men, irrespective of the age difference.

3. Oxytocin works differently for women

Image source: Max Pixel
Image source: Max Pixel

Oxytocin is a vital hormone for the human race. It is integral in feeling closeness and happiness from social and intimate bonds.

This hormone is in action when you are cuddling or have physical intimacy with someone. However, in women, it also helps them bond with their newborns and expand/contract uterine muscles during labor.

4. Their eyes see things differently

Image source: Getty Images
Image source: Getty Images

To women, the grass generally seems greener than it does to men (literally). In most of the visible spectrum, women can pick up the color’s hue even when they have shorter wavelengths.

While on the other hand, men need slightly longer wavelength to feel the same. Therefore, an orange may appear redder to men.

5. Women have different brains than men

Image source: pixabay
Image source: pixabay

In a study conducted at the University of Edinburgh by a team of psychologists led by Stuart Ritchie, it was found that women have larger cerebral cortex (the outer layer of the frontal lobe, vital for consciousness) than men.

Thicker cortices are associated with higher scores on IQ tests. While men have 14 regions with higher brain volumes, women have 10 regions with higher brain volumes.

6. Women get drunk faster

Image source: Pixabay
Image source: Pixabay

When undigested alcohol enters one’s bloodstream and makes its way to their brain, they get drunk. Usually, much of the alcohol is digested and broken down by an enzyme – alcohol dehydrogenase, produced in our stomach.

According to researchers from the University School of Medicine in Trieste, Italy, women’s stomach produces less of this enzyme than men, resulting in more unbroken alcohol reaching their brain via their bloodstream.  

7. Women are more prone to neck pain

Image source: Pixabay
Image source: Pixabay

According to Dr. Meda Raghavendra and Dr. Joseph Holtman of Loyola University Medical Center, women suffer more from neck pain more than men owing to the cervical disc degeneration.

Cervical degenerative disc disease is characterized by a stiff neck, burning, tingling, and numbness or severe pain.

8. Women are more predisposed to sleeping disorders

Image source: Pixabay
Image source: Pixabay

A group of researchers at SleepGP, which specializes in sleep medicine training, found in their studies that women are more likely to suffer from sleep disorders associated with daytime sleepiness.  

Moreover, they also state that women are more likely to experience fatigue and depression and more stress while suffering from it.  

Note: This article is purely for light entertainment purposes only.

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