JOMO (joy of missing out) is the new mojo for reducing anxiety

JOMO (joy of missing out) is the new mojo for reducing anxiety

The entire movement needs one thing, to be okay with where one is and what they are doing at that moment in life, regardless of where others may be

Despite it being predicted before by writers such as George Orwell and Aldous Huxley in the last century, the questionable effects of technology on humanity are still surpassing those predictions at an unnerving rate. Social media's colorful lights and a different platform of existence has seen many defined spectra of human emotions and behaviors, including FOMO (Fear of missing out).

What would life be without FOMO? (Pexels)
What would life be without FOMO? (Pexels)
FOMO enhances one's insecurities about themselves (Pexels)
FOMO enhances one's insecurities about themselves (Pexels)

FOMO - fear of missing out- is described as anxiety stemming from the fear that something exciting and amazing is happening somewhere else. This anxiety can get worse when they see social media posts and images of great times that one's friends may be having without them. FOMO was said to have a lot of adverse effects on individuals, a report by CBC News talks about an interesting solution to FOMO.  

To enjoy life, one needs to let go of 'shoulds' and 'have to' (Pexels)
To enjoy life, one needs to let go of 'shoulds' and 'have to' (Pexels)

As an answer to this, a new trend called JOMO - joy of missing out - is being picked up by people. One of the early proponents of this term was Christina Crook, the author of a recent release: 'The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World'The driving philosophy behind JOMO is to embrace where one is at present and appreciating human connections. Moreover, JOMO promotes not living by 'shoulds' and 'wants' and comparisons but being content with the current selves that we are. 

Do you wait for moments when something cool is happening on social media? (Pexels)
Do you wait for moments when something cool is happening on social media? (Pexels)

Many believe that it is humanity's over-dependence on technology for staying connected that has given rise to such hyper-connected societies. People now can see their loved ones from across borders on their screens with just a couple of clicks or voice commands. This situation resembles a scarier picture than what Jean Baudrillard's simulacra and simulation painted years ago - where nothing is original, as the original has been replaced completely by its copy and its copies.



Kristen Fuller, MD, writes on Psychology Today, saying: "We wield the power of a “like”, which stimulates the firing of dopamine in our brains and soon we become addicted to the knowing, the likes, the instant gratification, the attention and the busyness, so we keep going back for more."



It is important to spot if one is falling prey to FOMO regularly. Since FOMO is driven by the pressure to be seen with the right people in the right places. If one can't help but be propelled to attend all the apparent fun things and events, they may find themselves in situations where they do not enjoy everything that is going on. 

FOMO has managed to be so strong in people that even the language used for communication has become minimalistic and atrophied. When quick and anxious typers end up substituting conversations with broken words and fragmented and disconnected phrases. 

Here's how one can try JOMO: 

1. Have an intention 

Figure out what is important to you (Pexels)
Figure out what is important to you (Pexels)

A well-plotted schedule does the trick here. One needs to write down tasks that are most important to them. This changes the focus from thinking about others to thinking about ourselves. This is a basic function of prioritization. 

It could be anything, from a siblings visit to the museum or a coffee meeting with one's best friends. You could take up passion projects or things you have wanted to do. A simple and planned list of actions is what one will need to begin living in the present.

2. Live with the real 

Allow life to happen to you (Pexels)
Allow life to happen to you (Pexels)

We sometimes tend to go back to our most comforting tasks when we find something not going our way. It is natural to seek affirmation; and what better source than the social media? It's a great time killer, right? Try living in the objective reality, it's not as radical as it sounds. 

Embrace whatever feeling your evening evokes, take the moment to explore how you have felt over time about the same thing. Cherish small victories and disengage yourself from the competitions for likes and shares on social media. Let life happen to you.

3. Turn down the pace a bit 

Give yourself time to feel and think (Pexels)
Give yourself time to feel and think (Pexels)

One of the impacts of FOMO is that one would want to be fast with things. Thoughts, emotions, words, everything is a mix smash that is taken in without realizing their entirety and magnitude, to shift to a whole new set of other feelings and emotions with one flick on the phone. 

Try reconnecting with yourself (Pexels)
Try reconnecting with yourself (Pexels)

Try investing some time before speaking out loud or try reflecting on the silence and what it means to you. One could just sit with their thoughts and oneself. One may notice that once they practice slower pace and punctuated efforts, it can increase creativity since you are taking in so much data objectively. Disconnect with technology, reflect on the thoughts you have and eventually, you'll be able to reconnect with yourself.

4. Give yourself a break from tech

How distant have you grown from yourself? (Pexels)
How distant have you grown from yourself? (Pexels)

Now this one might be a bit challenging. Obviously, it involves you to distance yourself from social media accounts, unsubscribing from them would be ideal. This would mainly allow one to have a breathing room from all the FOMO triggering pages and people that one follows. A change in perspective will help in knowing what is more important to you. 

Try outdoor activities with real people that matter to you (Pexels)
Try outdoor activities with real people that matter to you (Pexels)

It would also bring you considerable respite from the taxing fast lane of FOMO that even your friends can trigger unknowingly when they post stuff online. Tell one of your family members to remind you of your daily social media usage. Removal of certain social media apps may also help a lot. 



Disclaimer : This article is for your entertainment / infotainment purposes.

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