Kyle Plush, 16, is crushed to death after being trapped in car despite calling 911 multiple times

Kyle Plush, 16, is crushed to death after being trapped in car despite calling 911 multiple times

A 16-year-old student at Ohio's Seven Hills school made a 911 call begging for help hours before he was found dead inside his van on Tuesday night.

A student was crushed to death in the back of a minivan at a school parking lot, in spite of calling law enforcement authorities twice with his exact location, Ohio police said.

An investigation has been launched by the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office into the death of 16-year-old Kyle Plush. His body was found by his father almost six hours after he dialed 911 begging for help and providing officers with the correct description of his location and the minivan he was trapped in, reported Fox News.

Plush called the authorities at least twice on Tuesday afternoon while he was trapped in the 2002 Honda Odyssey minivan outside Seven Hills School, according to audio recordings released by the Sheriff's office. He had been pinned inside the van when the third-row seat of the van flipped and trapped him.

16-year-old Kyle Plush (above) was crushed to death in the back of a minivan at a school parking lot in spite of calling law enforcement authorities twice with his exact location. (Source: Facebook)
16-year-old Kyle Plush (above) was crushed to death in the back of a minivan at a school parking lot in spite of calling law enforcement authorities twice with his exact location. (Source: Facebook)

The teenager appeared to use voice commands to dial for help, urging dispatchers to tell his mother he loves her if he dies.

“I’m going to die here,” the sophomore told the dispatcher during his first 911 call, which was placed shortly after 3 pm on Tuesday. “I probably don’t have much time left. Tell my mom I love her if I die.”

The dispatcher asked several times, “Where are you?” and “What is the address?”

According to the police, the dispatcher can be heard asking for his location several times in the recording. However, it was unclear if the 16-year-old heard the operator's questions.

Even then, a Hamilton County deputy sheriff along with Cincinnati police responded to the area but was unable to locate Plush. When the dispatcher tried to call the sophomore's phone, it went to voicemail.

“Hello, this is Kyle. I’m not available right now. I’ll get back to you as soon as I can," was the automated response.

Plush, during his second 911 call at 3:35 pm, begged to another dispatcher saying that “this is not a joke.”

"I am trapped inside my gold Honda Odyssey van in the parking lot of the Seven Hills. ... Send officers immediately. I’m almost dead.”

The information about the make and model of the vehicle Plush was trapped in was not conveyed to the responding officers because the  “dispatcher did not communicate with the caller", according to Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac.

Responding officers can be heard in the recording saying that they had checked all the vehicles they could in the area but couldn't find anyone inside, eventually leaving the scene. An officer even suggested that it could be a prank call for all they know.

"I was in there, I just looked in a van over there, I didn't see anybody in it," a deputy responds.

Plush did not tell the authorities what had happened to him when he apparently used an automated assistant on his smartphone to make the call Tuesday outside Seven Hills School in Cincinnati. 

16-year-old Plush appeared to use voice commands to dial for help, urging dispatchers to tell his mother he loves her if he dies. (Source: Facebook)

16-year-old Plush appeared to use voice commands to dial for help, urging dispatchers to tell his mother he loves her if he dies. (Source: Facebook)

“Help, help, help, help,” he told the dispatcher, according to 911 audio obtained by The Washington Post. Then he let out a scream: “Help!”

The teen, who appeared to be trying hard to breathe, repeatedly asked for the police — briefly pausing between each word to try to catch his breath.

The dispatcher repeatedly asked the teen where they could find him.

“I can’t hear you,” the teen said. Distant banging could be heard in the background. “I’m in desperate need of help. … I’m going to die here.”

“Help —” he said once more, and then the call abruptly ended.

 The dispatcher that received Kyle Plush's second 911 call did not convey the information Plush provided to officers on the scene where he later died, police said. (Source: Facebook)
 The dispatcher that received Kyle Plush's second 911 call did not convey the information Plush provided to officers on the scene where he later died, police said. (Source: Facebook)

During the second call, which lasted several minutes, he sounded weaker and something could be heard creaking in the background as the teen struggled to breathe. The teen told the dispatcher to pass along a message for him after he died, reported the Washington Post.

“Can you hear me?” the teen asked.

In the recording, Plush can be heard asking “Hey Siri” several times, but his desperate pleas went unanswered.

Over six hours after the distress calls, his father found the minivan with Kyle's body inside.

“Horrific, horrific situation to come across as a parent,” Cincinnati Police spokesman Lt. Steve Saunders said Thursday in a phone interview.

The death was ruled as a case of "accidental asphyxia due to chest compression," according to to the Hamilton County coroner. He concluded that there had been no foul play during the response.



"My son never came home from school," the victim's mother says on a separate 911 call, also released Wednesday. "And we thought he was at a tennis match. And he never came home from school."

"I put in there (the victim) could possibly be in the thrift store parking lot across the street," a dispatcher says on one of the phone calls released Wednesday.

According to a report by Fox News, the victim's initial 911 call was made at 3:16 p.m. The first unit to respond was on scene by 3:26 p.m. and the call was listed as closed by 3:37 pm. According to CPD records, 11 minutes and 38 seconds passed between police arriving on the scene and the call closing.

A classmate called Kyle's parents late Tuesday, asking why he did not show up for a scheduled tennis match, according to authorities.



According to the police, the teen's parents used an app to track Kyle's cell phone and then called the authorities, saying that their son was missing.

Isaac told reporters that upon arrival, responding officers found Kyle in the van “not breathing and unresponsive.” First responders were not able to revive the teen, Isaac said.

“This was a horrific tragedy. What I say is that we share in their heartbreak around this,” Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac said during an afternoon news conference. “Police officers, firefighters, and even our emergency dispatch personnel — you get into this because you want to help. Something went wrong here and we need to find out why we weren’t able to provide that help that we hoped we could have.”

Excerpt from a statement released by the school community. (Source: Facebook)
Excerpt from a statement released by the school community. (Source: Facebook)

"Our deepest sympathies are with the family and friends of Kyle," reads a press release from Coroner Lakshmi Sammarco.

The police chief said that the dispatcher who has answered the second call was placed on administrative leave until the investigation was over. Authorities are looking at human and mechanical elements that led to the teenager's death.

The Cincinnati Police Department said in a released statement that it will initiate a full procedural and technical review of all calls received by the Emergency Communications Section and associated dispatch recordings related to this incident.

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